People

Sam H. Au
Lecturer (assistant professor equivalent)
Postdoctoral Fellow - Harvard Medical School & Massachusetts General Hospital (2017)
PhD; Biomedical Engineering - University of Toronto (2013)
BSc; Chemical Engineering - University of Calgary (2008)

Sam joined the Bioengineering Department of Imperial College London in 2017 as a principal investigator after holding a Tosteson postdoctoral fellowship in the lab of Prof. Mehmet Toner at Harvard Medical School where he studied the biomechanics of circulating tumor cell cluster behavior within the microcirculation using microfluidic models of capillaries. Prior to this, Sam completed his PhD with Prof. Aaron Wheeler at the University of Toronto developing digital microfluidic tools and techniques for cellular applications and has industrial R&D experience at leading technology companies including Genentech Inc. and Corning Inc. He also serves on the Associate Scientific Advisory Board of Science Translational Medicine.
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Julian Ashby
PhD Candidate
PhD student; Bioengineering – Imperial College (2017)
MEng; Chemical Engineering with Bioprocess Engineering – Newcastle University (2013-2017)
Julian joined the Bio Micro Mechanics (BMM) Lab at the Department of Bioengineering of Imperial College in 2017 as a PhD student. Julian is enthusiastic in the application of engineering in cancer research and his PhD focuses on exploring the role of cell and tissues biomechanics in cancer using microfluidic approaches. As an undergraduate Julian completed his MEng in Chemical Engineering with Bioprocess Engineering at Newcastle University. His research thesis was on ‘Tuning hyaluronan hydrogels to match the mechanical properties of tumours’, which enhanced his understanding on the tumour microenvironment.
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Carlos Matellan
PhD Candidate
PhD student; Bioengineering – Imperial College (2017)
MRes; Bioengineering – Imperial College (2016-2017)
BSc; Biomedical Engineering – Universidad Carlos III (2011-2015)
Carlos joined the department of Bioengineering Department at Imperial College London in 2016 as an MRes student developing techniques for cost effective rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. He continued in the same department in 2017 as a PhD student in the Cellular and Molecular Biomechanics Laboratory (CMBL) and the Bio Micro Mechanics Laboratory (BMM). Before this, Carlos dedicated his undergraduate project to the development of a skin-on-a-chip device for drug and cosmetic screening. His research interests focus on the application of microfluidic tools as an enabling technology in biomedical research, particularly to understand the biomechanics of cancer metastasis.
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Nathalie Farhoudi
MSc Candidate
Msc Student; Biomedical Engineering – Imperial College (2017-2018) BEng: Medical Engineering with Year in Industry – Swansea University (2013-2017)
Nathalie joined the Department in order to complete her final year project involving paper microfluidics. The project focusses on highlighting the drawbacks of using paper as a liquid handling system, and using the wide range of resources that the Department provides to create liquid handling control elements, such as valves and reservoirs directly onto the paper. The aim of the project will be to produce low-cost hybrid 3D printed-paper microfluidic platforms that are easily reproducible, for applications such as diabetes and cancer. Nathalie is looking forward to exploring and gaining valuable skills in the area of microfluidics and also to work in a Lab for the first time!
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Horia Giuglea
MSc Candidate
Msc Student; Biomedical Engineering – Imperial College (2017-2018) BEng: Mechanical Engineering – University of Manchester (2017)
Horia is a new student at Imperial College London, previously completing his BEng degree in Mechanical Engineering at The University of Manchester. The project he is currently working on involves the fabrication of microchannels in hydrogels for lab-on-a-chip studies. The rationale for this project has been to study the behavior of cells within the circulatory system, especially through capillary-sized vessels, and the study of their behavior within the microchannels can lead to a better understanding of the cell behavior in the body. He is eager to get hands on experience in a lab and learn about microfluidics.
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